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Phenomenology and Multi-Dimensional Human Development
 
 
Phenomenology and Multi-Dimensional Human Development
Course in Business Comunications
 
Phenomenology and Multi-Dimensional Human Development

The following course in Phenomenology and Multi-Dimensional Human Development is provided in its entirety by Atlantic International University's "Open Access Initiative" which strives to make knowledge and education readily available to those seeking advancement regardless of their socio-economic situation, location or other previously limiting factors. The University's Open Courses are free and do not require any purchase or registration, they are open to the public.

The course in Phenomenology and Multi-Dimensional Human Development contains the following:

  • Lessons in video format with explaination of theoratical content.
  • Complementary activities that will make research more about the topic , as well as put into practice what you studied in the lesson. These activities are not part of their final evaluation.
  • Texts supporting explained in the video.
  • Evaluation questionnaire, that will grant access to the next lesson after approval.

The Administrative Staff may be part of a degree program paying up to three college credits. The lessons of the course can be taken on line Through distance learning. The content and access are open to the public according to the "Open Access" and " Open Access " Atlantic International University initiative. Participants who wish to receive credit and / or term certificate , must register as students.


Lesson 1: Phenomenology: a historical perspectiv

The purpose of this session is to explain the historical context in which phenomenology arises as a philosophy in the twentieth century. Etymology is the study of the origin of words and the way in which their meanings have changed throughout history. Phenomenology means literally the study of phenomena, which arethe object of a person’s perception. The word phenomenology gets its origins from the ancient Greek word phainomenon, which means that which appears or is seen, and also logia or logos, which is an important term in philosophy meaning a speaking, dialogue, discourse, treatise, doctrine, theory, or science. The term would come to stand for a philosophical system which studies of the structures of experience and consciousness early in the 20th century.


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Lesson 2: Modernity: The Fundamental Characteristics

Modernity refers to a period of time, typically the 18th and early 19th centuries, which saw a vast number of people leave simple self sufficient farming lives in order to live in cities and work for wages. The rise of capitalism is one of the hallmarks of modernity, ; this is accompanied by a number of incredible achievements in science and technology that allow for the rise of wide scale industrialization. Along with the rise of science comes a new way for humans to understand life, there is a new respect for the principle of reason, and a decline in the number of people who follow any of the worlds religions. There are new sciences which view human subjectivity as the foundation for knowledge, and a new notion of individualism which encourages you to go out and learn who you are and be true to yourself.

 

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Lesson 3: Husserl’s Phenomenology


Edmund Husserl was born in Prossnitz, Moraiva, in what is now the Czech Republic in April, 1859. He studied mathematics at the Universities of Leipzig, and Berlin, before receiving his PhD in Mathematics from the University of Vienna in 1883. Husserl had many other interests including astronomy, physics, psychology and philosophy; he attended philosophical lectures by WIllhelm Wundt and Friedrich Paulsen, among others, during his time studying mathematics. After completing his PhD in Mathematics, Husserl wished to further his study in philosophy and began studying under psychologist Franz Brentano, who he was greatly influenced by. Brentano is mainly known for introducing the notion of intentionality to philosophy. Shortly after studying under Brentano, Husserl began to produce his own work

 

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Lesson 4: The phenomenology of Marin Heidegger

Martin Heidegger was born in Messkirch, Germany, on September 26, 1889. Messkirch was a quite, conservative, religious town in the heart of Germany; growing up here would have an influence on Heidegger’s thought. In 1909 he went to the University of Freiburg to study theology, and in 1911 he switched subjects to philosophy. In 1915 the philosopher Edmund Husserl began teaching at Freiburg, and Heidegger became his student and assistant. In 1917 Heidegger married Elfride Petri, the couple had 2 children and never separated, although Heidegger had a well known affair with German-American political theorist and writer Hannah Arendt. 1 Heidegger spent much of his life in the black forest of Germany; he considered the seclusion provided to be the best environment to engage in philosophical thought

 

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Lesson 5: Heidegger’s phenomenology and thought continued

“This averageness, which prescribes what can and may be ventured, watches over every exception which thrusts itself to the fore. Every priority is noiselessly squashed. Overnight, everything primordial is flattened down as something long since known. Everything gained by a struggle becomes something to be manipulated. Every mystery loses its power. The care of averageness reveals, in turn, an essential tendency of Dasein, which we call the leveling down of all possibilities of being.”1 Heidegger thought we must take great care to protect Dasein from the powerful influence of the other. But is this everyday life avoidable?

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Lesson 6: The Social Development of Man


In 15,000 years humans have gone from hunting and gathering to building megacities, spaceships and the internet. How we got there is an interesting story. Sir Edward Burnett Tylor was an English anthropologist first proposed that human cultures developed through three fundamental stages consisting of savagery, barbarism, and civilization. American anthropologist Lewis H. Morgan’s took up Tylor’s theory and refined it by describing the stages themselves in terms of technology.

 

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Lesson 7: CULTURAL AND POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT OF MAN


The urge to reproduce and the need to preserve the body are biological priorities. They come from the culmination of billions of years of genetic evolution. Humans share these needs along with most of the other animals and plants on the planet, we are biologically driven creatures. But as humans, we are much more than that, we are social creatures; and in a much more complex manner than any other creature. The ways we treat each other, our personal and public relationships can have as much influence on our behavior as our instincts do. Our cultures did not just spring up out of nowhere, they have underwent thousands of years of cultural evolution. The human mind has also had to evolve in order to keep up with these cultures.

 

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Lesson 8: Development of Thought


The word "philosophy" comes from the Ancient Greek philosophia, which literally means "love of wisdom". The pre-Socratics were 6th and 5th century BCE Greek thinkers who introduced a new way of inquiring into the world and the place of human beings in it. They were recognized in antiquity as the first philosophers and scientists of the Western tradition. The early Greek philosophers thought of themselves as inquirers into many things, and the range of their inquiry was vast. They had views about the nature of the world, and these views encompass what we today call physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, astronomy, embryology, and psychology (and other areas of natural inquiry), as well as theology, metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics.

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Lesson 9: Development of Thought continued

The dispute between rationalism and empiricism concerns the extent to which we are dependent upon sense experience in our effort to gain knowledge. Rationalists claim that there are significant ways in which our concepts and knowledge are gained independently of sense experience. Empiricists claim that sense experience is the ultimate source of all our concepts and knowledge. The dispute between rationalism and empiricism takes place within epistemology, the branch of philosophy devoted to studying the nature, sources and limits of knowledge. The defining questions of epistemology include the following. What is knowledge? Or how do we know that a particular proposition about the world is true? What is the source of this knowledge? Does it come from experience? What are the limits of knowledge? Or what can we know, and what can’t we..

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Lesson 10: Development of Consciousness

What is consciousness? Consciousness is still a mystery to man. Perhaps no aspect of mind is more familiar or more puzzling than consciousness and our conscious experience of self and world. While the science of physics is not complete, it is well enough understood; and the science of biology has answered many ancient questions regarding the nature of life, even if there are still gaps in our knowledge. Consciousness is another story.
While we are relatively sure consciousness arises from the physical system of the brain, we are not sure how it arises or why it arises. How can a physical system like the brain also be an experiencer? We are ore familiar with consciousness than anything else in the world, nothing is presented more directly to us. Descartes is famous for saying I can doubt the existence of the outside world, even my own body, But, I think, I am conscious, therefore I am. I can question your consciousness, maybe you just look conscious and nothing is really going on up there, but I cannot question my own.

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