Home Courses About Feedback
Courses Content
Public Speaking
 
 
Public Speaking
Course in Business Comunications
 
Public Speaking

The following course in Public Speaking is provided in its entirety by Atlantic International University's "Open Access Initiative" which strives to make knowledge and education readily available to those seeking advancement regardless of their socio-economic situation, location or other previously limiting factors. The University's Open Courses are free and do not require any purchase or registration, they are open to the public.

The course in Public Speaking Learning contains the following:

  • Lessons in video format with explaination of theoratical content.
  • Complementary activities that will make research more about the topic , as well as put into practice what you studied in the lesson. These activities are not part of their final evaluation.
  • Texts supporting explained in the video.
  • Evaluation questionnaire, that will grant access to the next lesson after approval.

The Administrative Staff may be part of a degree program paying up to three college credits. The lessons of the course can be taken on line Through distance learning. The content and access are open to the public according to the "Open Access" and " Open Access " Atlantic International University initiative. Participants who wish to receive credit and / or term certificate , must register as students.


Lesson 1: HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF HUMANS IN DIFFERENT CULTURES

Early training in public speaking took place in ancient Egypt. The first known Greek work] on oratory, written over 2000 years ago, elaborated principles drawn from the practices and experience of orators in the ancient Greek city-states. In classical Greece and Rome, the main component wasrhetoric (that is, composition and delivery of speeches), and was an important skill in public and private life. Aristotle and Quintilian discussed oratory, and the subject, with definitive rules and models, was emphasised as a part of a liberal arts education during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The art of public speaking was first developed] by the ancient Greeks. Greek oration is known from the works of classical antiquity. Greek orators spoke, on their own behalf rather as representatives of either a client or a constituency, and so any citizen who wished to succeed in court, in politics, or in social life had to learn techniques of public speaking. These skills were taught first by a group of self-styled "sophists" who were known to charge fees, to "make the weaker argument the stronger," and to make their students "better" through instruction in excellence. Plato, Aristotle, andSocrates all developed theories of public speaking in opposition to the Sophists, and their ideas took on institutional form through the development of permanent schools where public speaking was taught. Though Greece eventually lost political sovereignty, the Greek culture of training in public speaking was adopted virtually wholesale by the Romans.


Video Conference

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 2: SPEECH PREPARATION ANALYSIS

You've been asked to be the Best Man of a good friend who you know through work. You start thinking about the guy you know though the office, the joker, the work-related social gatherings you've attended. You figure you've got some great material for your speech. But, you think smartly, it's time to find out if there is more to the occasion. Aspects to his life of which you are not aware. You contact the groom's sister and ask whether there is anything to consider. Yes, she tells you, their mother has a grave illness and will not be able to attend the wedding. Also, the groom's brother is serving overseas and also not be able to attend the wedding. Suddenly a simple best man speech has become something completely different. It is a bittersweet occasion due to the absence of close family. There is also serious illness in the family. You also realize that you have likely been asked to be best man due to the absence of a brother in patriotic duty overseas.

 

Video Conference

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 3: PHONATION AND FORMS OF SPEECH


Those who aspire to be voice-over artists, stand-up performers or even great orators need a couple of simple techniques up their sleeve for greater success. These techniques are what enables them to speak more lucidly and emphatically. Children make erroneous pronunciation at the initial stages, which are particularly amusing and frivolous. However, if after a certain age, it doesn’t change, then the child is said to be suffering from some kind of speech disorder. In such cases, articulation exercises may be of immense help in overcoming and even eliminating the impediments. If a child is diagnosed with speech disorders, it is suggested that these techniques must be adopted and implemented by their parents at the very inception.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 4: SPEAKER AND AUDIENCE

Keeping audience attention is more important and more difficult than grabbing audience attention. A one-way presentation is one of the worst possible ways of transferring information from person to person. It requires discipline and effort to simply sit and listen passively to someone speak for any length of time. Make it easier for your audience by following these seven guidelines: [Warning: The first three guidelines require that you know your audience - do the work to find out what your audience is interested in, their background knowledge, level of experience etc.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 5: THE USE OF SPACE WHILE PUBLIC SPEAKING

Filler words — including um and uh— are never written into a speech, and add nothing when a speaker utters them. Yet these insidious verbal hiccups are ubiquitous, uttered by most speakers in most speeches every day. Um… What’s the Problem? Some people adopt a zero tolerance policy when it comes to filler words, believing that a few ruin the delivery and invalidate an otherwise solid speech. An occasional filler word does not trump passion and a great message. Furthermore, audience members comment that an occasional filler word makes the speaker seem human (and not robotic).

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 6: CONQUERING FEAR IN PUBLIC SPEAKING


Some people do this with avoidance. They choose college coursework in such a way as to avoid public speaking, rather than taking the classes they want. At work, they pass up promotions and assignments which would require speaking. The fear of public speaking may even lead people to choose a career that doesn't call for public speaking, rather than one they want. This is often the case with people who have feared public speaking from a very young age.
Others don't go that far, but will go to great lengths to avoid making presentations, or even just having to speak at a meeting. They may deliberately arrive late, hoping to miss the customary introductions ("let's go around and introduce ourselves...").

 

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 7: GOOD PRESENTATION

When you are presenting in front of an audience, you are performing as an actor is on stage. How you are being perceived is very important. Dress appropriately for the occasion. Be solemn if your topic is serious. Present the desired image to your audience. Look pleasant, enthusiastic, confident, proud, but not arrogant. Remain calm. Appear relaxed, even if you feel nervous. Speak slowly, enunciate clearly, and show appropriate emotion and feeling relating to your topic. Establish rapport with your audience. Speak to the person farthest away from you to ensure your voice is loud enough to project to the back of the room. Vary the tone of your voice and dramatize if necessary. If a microphone is available, adjust and adapt your voice accordingly.
Body language is important. Standing, walking or moving about with appropriate hand gesture or facial expression is preferred to sitting down or standing still with head down and reading from a prepared speech. Use audio-visual aids or props for enhancement if appropriate and necessary. Master the use of presentation software such as PowerPoint well before your presentation. Do not over-dazzle your audience with excessive use of animation, sound clips, or gaudy colors which are inappropriate for your topic. Do not torture your audience by putting a lengthy document in tiny print on an overhead and reading it out to them.

 

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 8: SUPPORTS IN PUBLIC SPEAKING


Good micro-structure REQUIRES that you have support for every point (assertion) you make. However, it is also valuable to use as many different types of support material as you can. A speech that is mostly statistics or only explanation is almost certainly going to be less interesting to the audience than a speech which includes stories, quotations, analogies, and examples as well as statistics or explanation. In fact, overuse of explanation is a very common weakness in speeches.
A variety of support types not only helps keep listener interest, it also builds your credibility. Research shows that speakers who use many kinds of support are judged to be more knowledgeable than those who don't and are regarded as better speakers.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 9: COURTESY AND MANNERS

Public Speaking Skills Lectern Etiquette Rule #1: Never touch the lectern inappropriately. Most of us would never dream of hitting, grabbing, or leaning on a child. Yet, I see speakers sprawled all over the lectern as they speak. Often new presenters are so nervous they grab the edges of the lectern - sometimes so tightly their knuckles turn white. Then there are those people who beat or pound on the lectern to drive a point home, leaving the audience feeling very defensive. The major problem with treating the lectern this way, aside from offending your audience, is that it distracts your audience and prevents them from hearing what you have to say. This doesn't help your cause. Improve your public speaking skills by standing 10 to 12 inches behind the lectern to avoid the temptation of touching it inappropriately.
Public Speaking Skills Lectern Etiquette Rule #2: Never leave the lectern unattended. You would never walk away and leave a child alone in a supermarket or in a train station, would you? No, that would be absurd. Now, how many times have you seen emcees announce the public speaker and then just walk away, leaving the spotlight and everyone's gaze on an empty podium? Every member of the audience feels this public display of awkwardness. It takes great public speaking skills on the part of the featured speaker to either cover up or make up for the lack of interaction.

.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 10: PUBLIC SPEAKING CLOSURE

If you can not cut any more, look at what your saying. Can you say anything more concisely and not lose the meaning you intend? Like the concept of white space in art and advertising, there needs to be silent space in your talk. Time to allow reflection and thought on what your saying. Time to absorb what you share. Your pauses need only be a few seconds each. Speak with a slower pace, and you may still have too much material. Cut some more. Now practice, practice, practice. Practice it to get it in your head. More importantly, practice is for getting it in your heart. Practice speaking from your heart to reach the heart of the audience. And for the sake of this speaker skill, practice for limiting public speaking time to the amount allotted for your talk.

 

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam


We understand how busy adults do not have time to go back to school. Now, it's possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home and still have time for yourself and your family. The Admissions office is here to help you, for additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us. If you are ready to apply please submit your Online Application and paste your resume and any additional comments/questions in the area provided. (Online Application) (Request Info)

Atlantic International University
800-993-0066 (Gratis en EUA)
808-924-9567 (Internacional)