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Sociology of Race Relations
 
Sociology of Race Relations
Sociology & Organizations Course
Sociology of Race Relations

The following course in Sociology of Race Relations is provided in its entirety by Atlantic International University's "Open Access Initiative" which strives to make knowledge and education readily available to those seeking advancement regardless of their socio-economic situation, location or other previously limiting factors. The University's Open Courses are free and do not require any purchase or registration, they are open to the public. 

Objectives for Sociology & Organizations:

The general objective of the course is to provide a sociological examination of the nature, causes, and consequences of social, economic and political inequalities among racial and ethnic groups. More specifically, after completing this course students will be able to:

• Demonstrate an understanding of the distinct histories and experiences of various cultural groups in the United States.

• Describe the challenges of living in a multicultural society.

• Challenge common misconceptions regarding minority groups that are pervasive in the media and general society. • Understand the nature of race and ethnic conflicts in the modern world.

Course Description for Sociology & Organizations:

The relationship between races and ethnicities is an essential phenomenon for understanding how the social building blocks of American society were established, and for attaining insight as to how the future may unfold in our increasingly diverse global setting. Although important, the study of race relations is also generally considered a controversial topic. This is true because it touches upon the histories and lives of many people who hold strong and diverse sentiments regarding who they are and where they came from. The challenge of this study, therefore, is to resist oversimplifications (i.e. “those types of people are just like that by nature”) as we analyze this phenomenon using historical observations and research, while considering more qualitative perspectives that are sensitive to individual experiences. The course will look into social, economic and political factors that have led to and sustain inequalities between diverse groups. The majority of our focus will be on race relations within the American society, although throughout the course we will expand our discussion into how these American social arrangements compare to, have been influenced by and have affected the global race arena.

 

Lesson 1: Conceptual and Theoretical Foundations
Reading: Chapter 1 of Diversity in America (pg 1-9)

Lesson 2: Conceptual and Theoretical Foundations
Reading: Chapter 1 of Diversity in America (pg 9-19)

Lesson 3: Diversity in the Pre-settlement Era
Reading: Chapter 2 of Diversity in America

Lesson 4: Diversity in Colonial Times
Reading: Chapter 3 of Diversity in America

Lesson 5: Immigration: the Early National Period
Reading: Chapter 4 of Diversity in America

Lesson 6: Immigration: the Age of Expansion
Reading: Chapter 5 of Diversity in America

Lesson 7: Diversity in the Industrial Age
Reading: Chapter 6 of Diversity in America

Lesson 8: Diversity in the Information Age
Reading: Chapter 7 of Diversity in America

Lesson 9: Intergenerational comparisons
Reading: Chapter 8 of Diversity in America (pgs 135- 143).

Lesson 10: Intergenerational comparisons
Reading: Chapter 8 of Diversity in America (pgs 135- 145)

Lesson 11: Is Multiculturalism a Threat?
Reading: Chapter 9 of Diversity in America

Lesson 12: Multiculturalism, post 9-11
Reading: Chapter 10 of Diversity in America

Lesson 13: Arab Americans Before and After 9/11
Reading: Ethnic Identity and Imperative Patriotism: Arab Americans Before and After 9/11(Article)

Lesson 14: The Next Horizon
Reading: Chapter 11 of Race and Ethnic Studies

Lesson 15: America’s demographic future
Reading: America’s demographic future (Article)

Lesson 16: Brazil & Racial Democracy
Reading: Race, Class and Color: Behind Brazil's "Racial Democracy" (Article)

 


Resources and Bibliography

• Article: Guimaraes, Sergio (2001). Race, Class and Color: Behind Brazil's "Racial Democracy". NACLA Report on the Americas 34 no. 6

• Article: Kotkin, J. & Ozuna, E. (2012). America’s demographic future. CATO Journal, 32(1), 55-69.

• Book: Parrillo, V. (2009). Diversity in America. 3rd ed. New York: Sage Publications

• Article: Salaita, Steven (2005). Ethnic Identity and Imperative Patriotism: Arab Americans Before and After 9/11. College Literature 32.2