Home Courses About Feedback
Courses Content
Static
 
 
Static
Course in Business Comunications
 
Static Course

The following course in Static is provided in its entirety by Atlantic International University's "Open Access Initiative" which strives to make knowledge and education readily available to those seeking advancement regardless of their socio-economic situation, location or other previously limiting factors. The University's Open Courses are free and do not require any purchase or registration, they are open to the public.

The course in Static contains the following:

  • Lessons in video format with explaination of theoratical content.
  • Complementary activities that will make research more about the topic , as well as put into practice what you studied in the lesson. These activities are not part of their final evaluation.
  • Texts supporting explained in the video..

The Administrative Staff may be part of a degree program paying up to three college credits. The lessons of the course can be taken on line Through distance learning. The content and access are open to the public according to the "Open Access" and " Open Access " Atlantic International University initiative. Participants who wish to receive credit and / or term certificate , must register as students.


Lesson 1: THE PARTICLE

An inclined plane is a flat supporting surface tilted at an angle, with one end higher than the other, used as an aid for raising or lowering a load. The inclined plane is one of the six classical simple machines defined by Renaissance scientists. Inclined planes are widely used to move heavy loads over vertical obstacles; examples vary from a ramp used to load goods into a truck, to a person walking up a pedestrian ramp, to an automobile or railroad train climbing a grade. Moving an object up an inclined plane requires less force than lifting it straight up, at a cost of an increase in the distance moved. The mechanical advantage of an inclined plane, the factor by which the force is reduced, is equal to the ratio of the length of the sloped surface to the height it spans. Due to conservation of energy, the same amount of mechanical energy (work) is required to lift a given object by a given vertical distance, disregarding losses from friction, but the inclined plane allows the same work to be done with a smaller force exerted over a greater distance.

Video Conference

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 2: THE PARTICLE II

The three laws of motion were first compiled by Isaac Newton in his Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), first published in 1687. Newton used them to explain and investigate the motion of many physical objects and systems. For example, in the third volume of the text, Newton showed that these laws of motion, combined with his law of universal gravitation, explained Kepler's laws of planetary motion.

Video Conference

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 3: Breakdown of forces in space

In physics, a force is any influence which tends to change the motion of an object. In other words, a force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin moving from a state of rest), i.e., to accelerate. Force can also be described by intuitive concepts such as a push or a pull. A force has both magnitude and direction, making it a vector quantity. It is measured in the SI unit of newtons and represented by the symbol F.
The original form of Newton's second law states that the net force acting upon an object is equal to the rate at which its momentum changes with time.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 4: THE PARTICLE IV

Mechanical equilibrium: A mechanical equilibrium is a state in which a momentum coordinate of a particle, rigid body, or dynamical system is conserved. Usually this refers to linear momentum. For instance, a linear mechanical equilibrium would be a state in which the linear momentum of the system is conserved at the net force on the object is zero. In the specific case that the linear momentum is zero and conserved, the system can be said to be in a static equilibrium. Of course, in any system is conserved linear momentum, it is possible to shift to a non-inertial reference frame that is stationary with respect to the object. In a rotational mechanical equilibrium the angular momentum of the object is conserved and the net torque is zero. More generally in conservative systems, equilibrium is established at a point in configuration space where the gradient with respect to the generalized coordinates of the potential energy is zero.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

Lesson 5: TIMES AND EQUIVALENT SYSTEMS

In general it is not feasible to consider bodies as point objects while considering the effect of forces. For tackling practical problems we need to take the dimension of bodies into account. A body which doesn’t deform by the application of force is termed as rigid bodies. Actual structures and machines, however, are never absolutely rigid and deform under the loads to which they are subjected.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 6: TIMES AND EQUIVALENT SYSTEMS II

If one introduces the concept of oriented areas for n-gons, then the area equality above holds for crossed quadrangles as well. The Varignon parallelogram exists even for a skew quadrilateral, and is planar whether or not the quadrilateral is planar. It can be generalized to the midpoint polygon of an arbitrary polygon.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 7: TIMES AND EQUIVALENT SYSTEMS III

In mechanics, a couple is a system of forces with a resultant (a.k.a. net or sum) moment but no resultant force. A better term is force couple or pure moment. Its effect is to create rotation without translation, or more generally without any acceleration of the centre of mass. In rigid body mechanics, force couples are free vectors, meaning their effects on a body are independent of the point of application.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 8: EQUILIBRIUM OF A RIGID BODY AND ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES

Rigid-body dynamics studies the movement of systems of interconnected bodies under the action of external forces. The assumption that the bodies are rigid, which means that they do not deform under the action of applied forces, simplifies the analysis by reducing the parameters that describe the configuration of the system to the translation and rotation of reference frames attached to each body.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 9: EQUILIBRIUM OF A RIGID BODY AND ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES II

It the unknown reaction components are less than the number of equilibrium equation, the structure is known as unstable. A structure is also defined as unstable if all the reaction components are concurrent or parallel (even if reactions are equal or more than the numbers of equations.) this is evident from the beam that if we change the hinged support at C to a roller support, all the reactions will be vertical and hence parallel to each other and this beam will not be able to support any horizontal force applied to it.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 

Lesson 10: EQUILIBRIUM OF A RIGID BODY AND ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES III

Because the mathematical concept of a matrix can be represented as a two-dimensional grid, two-dimensional arrays are also sometimes called matrices. In some cases the term "vector" is used in computing to refer to an array, although tuples rather than vectors are more correctly the mathematical equivalent. Arrays are often used to implement tables, especially lookup tables; the word table is sometimes used as a synonym of array. Arrays are among the oldest and most important data structures, and are used by almost every program. They are also used to implement many other data structures, such as lists andstrings.

Video Conference:

Lecture Materials

Exam

 


We understand how busy adults do not have time to go back to school. Now, it's possible to earn your degree in the comfort of your own home and still have time for yourself and your family. The Admissions office is here to help you, for additional information or to see if you qualify for admissions please contact us. If you are ready to apply please submit your Online Application and paste your resume and any additional comments/questions in the area provided. (Online Application) (Request Info)

Atlantic International University
800-993-0066 (Gratis en EUA)
808-924-9567 (Internacional)